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20121230
20121230
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of history people were miserably poor and died before age 40 and only recently things have changes. did you a chart this is life span. this is wealth. for most of history, people have been down here, only recently, the united states and some other countries are here, but many people are still, we have it here, stuck. >>guest: this is 180, -- 1800 everyone was sick and poor and they started to move. this is a representation of what you should look at on the web page and some -- this is britain. this is when britain was richer but the united states decided to catch up. and now this is australia and new zealand. now at turn of the century, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they have a lot of good publi health things being done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they missed. the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. today when we land, 2010, these are the countries that borrow money to the richest when they have their problems. >> in my mind this raises two question
miserabl miserables, raked in $116 million worldwide since opening on christmas day. it broke the record for the best opening day for any musical film. love it or hate it you probably already know some of the words. it's the kind of movie that stays with you you can the music on an endless loop in your head. ♪ pretending he is beside me ♪ do you hear the people sing >> director tom hooper made the film knowing he had an automatic audience. 60 million people around the world have seen the musical on stage since it opened in the mid'80s. so long ago, some of us have the soundtrack on cassette tape. this week, the digital version is a best seller again. news day theater critic linda winer says "les mis" was always critic-proof. >> very, very good marketing technique and then you have material that has stood the test of time. you know, victor hugo didn't write a bad book. >> reporter: there's something about that story set in the early 1830s in postrevolution france that somehow universally appealing. >> what he has done so brilliantly is actually tell the story of the human condition. t
? you would think that slavery was well entrenched. the black people were miserable. the whites were cruel and indifferent. that is actually not true at all. in washington, there were 30,000 people. 12,000 of them were black. the majority of black people in washington in 1830 were not slaves. out of the 12,000 black people, slightly more than half for free. >> washington d.c.'s first race riots. what part did francis scott key play? sunday night at 10:00 p.m. eastern. on c-span 2's book tv. >> next, california representative jerry lewis, who is retiring at the close of being 112th congress. this is about half an hour. >> congressmen jerry lewis, you are leaving after three plus decades here. in what ways is this institution different than when you joined? >> there have been many changes. the most significant difficulty with those changes is we have tended recently to more and more polarized ourselves. there is a tendency to want to paint everything in partisan terms. 90% of the issues we deal with have nothing to do with partisan politics. we are here to attempt to respond to our con
connecting the dots and they failed miserably. lou: pointing out directly al qaeda is far from dead andloe benghazi terrorist attacks. whether it amounts to a itewash. joining us now is judith miller, former u.s. amassador to the united nations, john bolton. thank you both for being here. i would like to start with a couple of the findings from the executive summary of this report. these two findings occur with one paragraph. first, embassy tripoli did not demonstrate strong and sustained advocacy with washington for increased security for special mission in benghazi. that means the consulate. lou: here's the other binding after one paraaph. in the days and months and weeks leading up to it, were inadequate. despite repeated requests and special mission in benghazi and embassy ipoli for additional staffing. judith miller, reconcile what was directly contradictory findings within a paragraph of one another. >> secretary of state clinton is going to have to answer that question. i think this is an incredibly damning report about the administration. the behavior and security posture in bengha
of chicago had a miserable year. 500 people murdered in chicago. overwhelmingly, those people killed were gang members. they were young, they were black and they were killed with a gun. want to talk with the top law enforcement official in the city of chicago right now, police superintendent garry mccarthy. welcome, superintendent. thank you for coming on on a saturday night to talk about this. >> thanks, don. my pleasure. it's really important that we do. >> you're relatively new to chicago, since last year. you have worked in other cities. you brought down murder rates in other cities. what is it about chicago that makes this awful figure possible, 500 murders in one year? >> well, there's a number of things. first of all, as is rightly identified, it's about the gang conflicts. and the second thing that really is overwhelming is the number of firearms in this city. as mr. pollack just said, last time i checked, that number was nine guns for every one that new york city took off the street. but the fact that -- we took nine for every one that new york city took off the street. and the f
. one is that all this money printing is masking miserable underlying conditions, that real wages haven't increased very much and the economy is in terrific shape. the other view is that the economy is okay and that this additional money printing will result in risk assets increasing in value. and you know, people in our shop, some people have the one view, other people have the other view. it's very interesting. we're in unusual times when additional research will go a long way in pointing out the mine fields. that's where we spend our time. >> that's where you do spend your time. you're independent, not paid by the people who you rate which gives you a credible voice. jim, for folks going out of the weekend into monday morning, they're worried maybe they don't see a deal. do you do anything with your investments? >> no, not in anticipation of a deal. what i would say strongly is if we don't have a deal and we go over the cliff and markets act negatively next week, you want to be a buyer of stocks for the intermediate and longer term. your only hope in this low pays nothing, bonds pay
, the city of chicago had a miserable year. 500 people murdered in chicago. overwhelmingly, those people killed were gang members. they were young, they were black and they were killed with a gun. want to talk with the top law enforcement official in the city of chicago right now, police superintendent garry mccarthy. welcome, superintendent. thank you for coming on on a saturday night to talk about this. >> thanks, don. my pleasure. it's really important that we do. >> you're relatively new to chicago, since last year. you have worked in other cities. you brought down murder rates in other cities. what is it about chicago that makes this awful figure possible, 500 murders in one year? >> well, there's a number of things. first of all, as is rightly identified, it's about the gang conflicts. and the second thing that really is overwhelming is the number of firearms in this city. as mr. pollack just said, last time i checked, that number was nine guns for every one that new york city took off the street. but the fact that -- we took nine for every one that new york city took off the stree
but secondly that the overall congress failed miserably in the final days to prevent a tax increase on middle income america and again could create some unforeseen consequences by virtue of the reactions that could occur not only in our own markets but global markets because we cannot get together and solve the problems for this country. >> senator, let me broaden that out a little bit. you are leaving the senate, you only have a couple days left actually, and your last vote well be on what has been an incredibly contentious but important issue. we are talking about tax hikes for anyone that basically gets a paycheck. if it is this difficult to dos this on something everybody says we can't raise taxes on the middle class, everybody says that, republicans and democrats, this difficult to come to an agreement what does that say about the future of immigration reform? what does that say about the future of anything that might be done about increased violence in schools or elsewhere? what does that say about important legislation that many americans would like to see happen? >> well, it does sugg
war, what would you think? well, savely was well entrenched. the black methamphetamine were miserable, the whites cruel and indifference. that's actually not true at all. in washington -- washington had 30 thousands people then as a city. 12,000 were black. the majority of the people in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12,000 people, slightly more than half were free. >> what led to washington, d.c.'s first race riots in 1835? what part did francis scott key play? jefferson recounts this almost forgotten chapter in history in "snowstorm in august" on c-span2's booktv.org. >> we don't know whether franklin roosevelt heard about forest greenberg's unprecedented call for health care as a right because even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose that time to go on vacation. frksz dr was actually on a cruise. it was probably a well-deserved vacation. three years earlier, he refused to include medical coverage because he didn't want to antagonize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the health department corchtion, but not long afterwards,
, you know, the black people were miserable, the whites were kind of cruel and indifferent. and that's actually not true at all. in washington, um, in washington -- washington had about 30,000 people then as a city, 12,000 of them were black. the majority of the black people in washington actually in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12,000 black people, slightly more than half were free. >> what led to washington, d.c.'s first race riots in 1835, and what part did francis scott key play? jefferson morley recounts this almost forgotten chapter in american history in "snowstorm in august," monday night at 10 eastern part of c-span2's booktv. >> washington post correspondent and author rajiv command chandr. his newest book "the little america." mr. chandrasekaran, when you talk about little america, what are you talking about? >> guest: i'm talking about this remarkable community that the americans built in the deserts of southern afghanistan not in the last couple years, but six decades ago. back when, unknown to most of our countrymen, there were dozens and dozens of america
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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